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Wednesday, June 02, 2004
Success!

I was at the grocery store this afternoon, getting a couple of things that aren't at all pertinent to this post. I also scoped out the ingredients for the Limeburner, thinking I'd get the stuff later and experiment this weekend. But I couldn't stand it -- I had to buy the supplies then and there! I got a bottle of ginger brandy, a four-pack of Reed's Premium Ginger Brew, and two fresh limes. I don't generally have ice in the house, so I put the brandy and a bottle of Reed's in the freezer to quick-chill. An hour later, I juiced the limes, got the bottles out of the freezer, and went to work. It was surprisingly easy to perfect. For my first attempt, I used one ounce of lime juice, one ounce of brandy, and probably about 6 ounces of ginger brew -- the ginger brew is the only thing I didn't actually measure. It tasted like really good ginger ale with a squeeze of lime. It was very good, but Kevin and I thought maybe we should be tasting the brandy a bit more. For the second attempt, I measured exactly: one ounce of lime juice, two ounces of brandy, and four ounces of ginger brew. I got exactly what I wanted -- a drink with the tang of lime juice, the bite of ginger, and that little bit of extra warmth from the brandy. How lucky was that?!?

As far as the theory to serve this drink on ice, I decided it's not necessary. As long as the ginger brew and lime juice are well chilled, the drink turns out at a perfectly good temperature. I believe that quality ingredients are key -- fresh lime juice, of course, can't be beaten. Its tartness and spiciness just aren't present in that plastic lime full of reconstituted juice. A more commercial ginger ale like Canada Dry or Schweppes would be too sweet and not gingery enough. Look for something called "ginger brew," "Jamaican style ginger ale," or something similar -- something with REAL ginger in it! As far as the brandy goes, my store only had two brands, at the same price, so I chose the one with the bottle I liked better. 

The Limeburner. Patent Pending. All rights reserved. Copyright me, 2004. Enjoy!

Oh, and it doesn't need to be set on fire, despite what Derrick thinks.

Posted at 6/2/2004 6:13:05 pm by KelliMelli

BEDbMAK2
July 8, 2005   07:23 AM PDT
 
Looks good
Ron
February 8, 2005   01:58 PM PST
 
and it got posted twice again because the "post" button didn't seem to blink the first time I clicked it, and so I clicked again, and then it blinked twice. I am much more patient with bread than I am with computers, especially this aggravating Windows-based machine I am forced to use at work. Macs are the machine for human beings.
Ron
February 8, 2005   01:56 PM PST
 
If you don't want people to comment, why have a comment area? The mention of abominations like bread machines apparently makes me as cranky and upset as you get by someone badmouthing them. Isn't it nice that there are so many people in the world, with so many different opinions? (Even if some of them are wrong.)
I am the assistant food editor of the Louisville, Ky Courier-Journal. You can find my food writing, such as it is, every Wednesday at www.courier-journal.com/features/food
I wasn't, by the way, attacking you. I was using the comment space for what I thought it was for, for your readers to reflect on food issues of importance to them, to articulate ideas, to put comments out there that would generate discussion.
I am glad to hear that you have graduated beyond the limited scope of what Japanese consumer-product engineers think of as bread. It is a lot better, isn't it, and it is fun and satisfying, isn't it, to mix and knead by hand? I have been doing it for probably 30 years now. Sometimes my bread is not as good as it usually is, odd regressions not to failure, but to less successfulness, that I can't quite figure out the reason for. But when that happens, I just try it again, trying to be more attentive to what I am doing, and generally the next batch is back to pleasantly high standards I have set for myself. I imagine you approach your cooking the same way.
Ron
February 8, 2005   01:56 PM PST
 
If you don't want people to comment, why have a comment area? The mention of abominations like bread machines apparently makes me as cranky and upset as you get by someone badmouthing them. Isn't it nice that there are so many people in the world, with so many different opinions? (Even if some of them are wrong.)
I am the assistant food editor of the Louisville, Ky Courier-Journal. You can find my food writing, such as it is, every Wednesday at www.courier-journal.com/features/food
I wasn't, by the way, attacking you. I was using the comment space for what I thought it was for, for your readers to reflect on food issues of importance to them, to articulate ideas, to put comments out there that would generate discussion.
I am glad to hear that you have graduated beyond the limited scope of what Japanese consumer-product engineers think of as bread. It is a lot better, isn't it, and it is fun and satisfying, isn't it, to mix and knead by hand? I have been doing it for probably 30 years now. Sometimes my bread is not as good as it usually is, odd regressions not to failure, but to less successfulness, that I can't quite figure out the reason for. But when that happens, I just try it again, trying to be more attentive to what I am doing, and generally the next batch is back to pleasantly high standards I have set for myself. I imagine you approach your cooking the same way.
 

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